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Welcome to the Hardcore Husky Forums. Folks who are well-known in Cyberland and not that dumb.

The Offseason Natty Thread: Portals, Assistant Coaches, Leopard Jackets, etc.

1565758596062»

Comments

  • RaceBannonRaceBannon Member, Swaye's Wigwam Posts: 82,584
    Swaye's Wigwam 50000 Comments 10,000 Awesomes 10,000 Up Votes
  • rodmansragerodmansrage Member, Swaye's Wigwam Posts: 4,258
    Swaye's Wigwam 5,000 Awesomes Eighth Anniversary 2,500 Up Votes
    https://247sports.com/LongFormArticle/College-football-bowl-projections-for-2022-season-Spring-practice-edition-185669005/

    we? are going to vegas to fight the fightin kiffins.

    whoregon (lol) in the holiday

    and trooj, coached by a coach who has yet to develop a qb, in the rose.

    none of this will happen but still.
  • haiehaie Member, Swaye's Wigwam Posts: 12,120
    Swaye's Wigwam 10,000 Up Votes 10,000 Awesomes Eighth Anniversary

    https://247sports.com/LongFormArticle/College-football-bowl-projections-for-2022-season-Spring-practice-edition-185669005/

    we? are going to vegas to fight the fightin kiffins.

    whoregon (lol) in the holiday

    and trooj, coached by a coach who has yet to develop a qb, in the rose.

    none of this will happen but still.

    Vegas against Ole Miss is a decent first year.

    High scoring game where we all get insanely fucked up either way. Woof
    theLSkid
  • rodmansragerodmansrage Member, Swaye's Wigwam Posts: 4,258
    Swaye's Wigwam 5,000 Awesomes Eighth Anniversary 2,500 Up Votes
    classy af for bRuins and domers to be playing an hbcu!
  • RaceBannonRaceBannon Member, Swaye's Wigwam Posts: 82,584
    Swaye's Wigwam 50000 Comments 10,000 Awesomes 10,000 Up Votes

    classy af for bRuins and domers to be playing an hbcu!
    Thats the spin

    Eddie George is the TSU coach
  • AZDuckAZDuck Member, Swaye's Wigwam Posts: 15,213
    Swaye's Wigwam 10,000 Up Votes 10,000 Awesomes Eighth Anniversary
  • DerekJohnsonDerekJohnson Administrator, Swaye's Wigwam Posts: 45,831
    Swaye's Wigwam Solar Eclipse Donator 10,000 Awesomes 10,000 Up Votes
  • GrundleStiltzkinGrundleStiltzkin Member, Swaye's Wigwam Posts: 57,013
    Swaye's Wigwam 50000 Comments 10,000 Up Votes 10,000 Awesomes

    I didn't know there was a Tennessee State
    Tennessee
    This article is about the U.S. state. For the river, see Tennessee River. For other uses, see Tennessee (disambiguation).
    "Tenn" redirects here. For the Japanese MC, see Tenn (MC).
    Tennessee
    ᏔᎾᏏ (Cherokee)
    Tanasi
    State
    State of Tennessee
    Nickname(s):
    The Volunteer State[1]
    Motto(s):
    Agriculture and Commerce
    Anthem: Nine songs
    Map of the United States with Tennessee highlighted
    Map of the United States with Tennessee highlighted
    Country United States
    Before statehood Southwest Territory
    Admitted to the Union June 1, 1796 (16th)
    Capital
    (and largest city) Nashville[2]
    Largest metro and urban areas Greater Nashville (combined and metro)
    Memphis (urban)
    Government
    • Governor Bill Lee (R)
    • Lieutenant Governor Randy McNally (R)
    Legislature General Assembly
    • Upper house Senate
    • Lower house House of Representatives
    Judiciary Tennessee Supreme Court
    U.S. senators Marsha Blackburn (R)
    Bill Hagerty (R)
    U.S. House delegation 7 Republicans
    2 Democrats (list)
    Area
    • Total 42,143 sq mi (109,247 km2)
    • Land 41,217 sq mi (106,846 km2)
    • Water 926 sq mi (2,401 km2) 2.2%
    • Rank 36th
    Dimensions
    • Length 440 mi (710 km)
    • Width 120 mi (195 km)
    Elevation 900 ft (270 m)
    Highest elevation
    (Clingmans Dome[3][a])
    6,643 ft (2,025 m)
    Lowest elevation
    (Mississippi River at Mississippi border[3][a])
    178 ft (54 m)
    Population
    (2020)
    • Total 6,916,897[4]
    • Rank 16th
    • Density 167.8/sq mi (64.8/km2)
    • Rank 20th
    • Median household income $53,320[5]
    • Income rank 42nd
    Demonym(s) Tennessean
    Big Bender (archaic)
    Volunteer (historical significance)
    Language
    • Official language English
    • Spoken language Language spoken at home[6]
    English: 94.6%
    Spanish: 3.9%
    Other: 1.5%
    Time zones
    East Tennessee UTC−05:00 (Eastern)
    • Summer (DST) UTC−04:00 (EDT)
    Middle and West UTC−06:00 (Central)
    • Summer (DST) UTC−05:00 (CDT)
    USPS abbreviation
    TN
    ISO 3166 code US-TN
    Traditional abbreviation Tenn.
    Latitude 34°59′ N to 36°41′ N
    Longitude 81°39′ W to 90°19′ W
    Website www.tn.gov
    hideTennessee state symbols
    Flag of Tennessee.svg
    Flag of Tennessee
    Seal of Tennessee.svg
    Living insignia
    Amphibian Tennessee cave salamander
    Bird Mockingbird
    Bobwhite quail
    Butterfly Zebra swallowtail
    Fish Channel catfish
    Smallmouth bass
    Flower Iris
    Passion flower
    Tennessee echinacea
    Insect Firefly
    Lady beetle
    Honey bee
    Mammal Tennessee Walking Horse
    Raccoon
    Reptile Eastern box turtle
    Tree Tulip poplar
    Eastern red cedar
    Inanimate insignia
    Beverage Milk
    Dance Square dance
    Firearm Barrett M82
    Food Tomato
    Fossil Pterotrigonia (Scabrotrigonia) thoracica
    Gemstone Tennessee River pearl
    Mineral Agate
    Poem "Oh Tennessee, My Tennessee" by William Lawrence
    Rock Limestone
    Slogan "Tennessee—America at its best"
    Tartan Tennessee State Tartan
    State route marker
    Tennessee state route marker
    State quarter
    Tennessee quarter dollar coin
    Released in 2002
    Lists of United States state symbols
    Tennessee (/ˌtɛnɪˈsiː/ (audio speaker iconlisten) TEN-ih-SEE, locally /ˈtɛnɪsi/ TEN-iss-ee),[7][8][9] officially the State of Tennessee, is a state in the Southeastern region of the United States. Tennessee is the 36th largest by area and the 16th most populous of the 50 states. It is bordered by Kentucky to the north, Virginia to the northeast, North Carolina to the east, Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi to the south, Arkansas to the southwest, and Missouri to the northwest. Tennessee is geographically, culturally, and legally divided into three Grand Divisions of East, Middle, and West Tennessee. Nashville is the state's capital and largest city, and anchors its largest metropolitan area. Other major cities include Memphis, Knoxville, Chattanooga, and Clarksville. Tennessee's population as of the 2020 United States census is approximately 6.9 million.[10]

    Tennessee is rooted in the Watauga Association, a 1772 frontier pact generally regarded as the first constitutional government west of the Appalachian Mountains.[11] Its name derives from "Tanasi", a Cherokee town in the eastern part of the state that existed before the first European American settlement.[12] Tennessee was initially part of North Carolina, and later the Southwest Territory, before its admission to the Union as the 16th state on June 1, 1796. It earned the nickname "The Volunteer State" early in its history due to a strong tradition of military service.[13] A slave state until the American Civil War, Tennessee was politically divided, with its western and middle parts supporting the Confederacy and the eastern region harboring pro-Union sentiment. As a result, Tennessee was the last state to secede and the first readmitted to the Union after the war.[14]

    During the 20th century, Tennessee transitioned from a predominantly agrarian society to a more diversified economy. This was aided in part by massive federal investment in the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and the city of Oak Ridge, which was established during World War II to house the Manhattan Project's uranium enrichment facilities for the construction of the world's first atomic bombs. These were dropped on Imperial Japan at the end of the war. After the war, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory became a key center of scientific research. In 2016, the element tennessine was named for the state, largely in recognition of the roles played by Oak Ridge, Vanderbilt University, and the University of Tennessee in its discovery.[15] Tennessee has also played a major role in the development of many forms of popular music, including country, blues, rock and roll, soul, and gospel.

    Tennessee has diverse terrain and landforms, and from east to west, contains a mix of cultural features characteristic of Appalachia, the Upland South, and the Deep South. The Blue Ridge Mountains along the eastern border reach some of the highest elevations in eastern North America, and the Cumberland Plateau contains many scenic valleys and waterfalls. The central part of the state is marked by cavernous bedrock and irregular rolling hills, and level, fertile plains define West Tennessee. The state is twice bisected by the Tennessee River, and the Mississippi River forms its western border. Its economy is dominated by the health care, music, finance, automotive, chemical, electronics, and tourism sectors, and cattle, soybeans, corn, poultry, and cotton are its primary agricultural products.[16] The Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the nation's most visited national park, is in eastern Tennessee.[17]

    Contents


    1 Etymology
    2 History
    2.1 Pre-European era
    2.2 Exploration and colonization
    2.3 Statehood and antebellum era
    2.4 Civil War
    2.5 Reconstruction and late 19th century
    2.6 Earlier 20th century
    2.7 Mid-20th century to present
    3 Geography
    3.1 Topography
    3.2 Hydrology
    3.3 Ecology
    3.4 Climate
    4 Cities, towns, and counties
    5 Demographics
    5.1 Ethnicity
    5.2 Religion
    6 Economy
    6.1 Taxation
    6.2 Agriculture
    6.3 Industry
    6.4 Business
    6.5 Energy and mineral production
    6.6 Tourism
    7 Culture
    7.1 Music
    8 Education
    8.1 Colleges and universities
    9 Media
    10 Transportation
    10.1 Roads
    10.2 Airports
    10.3 Railroads
    10.4 Waterways
    11 Law and government
    11.1 Executive and legislative branches
    11.2 Judicial system
    11.3 Local
    11.4 Federal
    11.5 Tribal
    12 Politics
    13 Sports
    14 See also
    15 Notes
    16 References
    16.1 Citations
    16.2 Bibliography
    17 Further reading
    18 External links
    Etymology

    Main article: Name of Tennessee
    Tennessee derives its name most directly from the Cherokee town of Tanasi (or "Tanase", in syllabary: ᏔᎾᏏ) in present-day Monroe County, Tennessee, on the Tanasi River, now known as the Little Tennessee River. This town appeared on British maps as early as 1725. In 1567, Spanish explorer Captain Juan Pardo and his men encountered a Native American village named "Tanasqui" in the area while traveling inland from modern-day South Carolina; however, it is unknown if this was the same settlement as Tanasi.[b] Recent research suggests that the Cherokees adapted the name from the Yuchi word Tana-tsee-dgee, meaning "brother-waters-place" or "where-the-waters-meet."[19][20][21] The modern spelling, Tennessee, is attributed to Governor James Glen of South Carolina, who used this spelling in his official correspondence during the 1750s. In 1788, North Carolina created "Tennessee County", and in 1796, a constitutional convention, organizing the new state out of the Southwest Territory, adopted "Tennessee" as the state's name.[22]

    PurpleBazeRaceBannon
  • CFetters_Nacho_LoverCFetters_Nacho_Lover Moderator, Swaye's Wigwam Posts: 20,023
    Swaye's Wigwam 10,000 Up Votes 10,000 Awesomes Ninth Anniversary

    I didn't know there was a Tennessee State
    Tennessee
    This article is about the U.S. state. For the river, see Tennessee River. For other uses, see Tennessee (disambiguation).
    "Tenn" redirects here. For the Japanese MC, see Tenn (MC).
    Tennessee
    ᏔᎾᏏ (Cherokee)
    Tanasi
    State
    State of Tennessee
    Nickname(s):
    The Volunteer State[1]
    Motto(s):
    Agriculture and Commerce
    Anthem: Nine songs
    Map of the United States with Tennessee highlighted
    Map of the United States with Tennessee highlighted
    Country United States
    Before statehood Southwest Territory
    Admitted to the Union June 1, 1796 (16th)
    Capital
    (and largest city) Nashville[2]
    Largest metro and urban areas Greater Nashville (combined and metro)
    Memphis (urban)
    Government
    • Governor Bill Lee (R)
    • Lieutenant Governor Randy McNally (R)
    Legislature General Assembly
    • Upper house Senate
    • Lower house House of Representatives
    Judiciary Tennessee Supreme Court
    U.S. senators Marsha Blackburn (R)
    Bill Hagerty (R)
    U.S. House delegation 7 Republicans
    2 Democrats (list)
    Area
    • Total 42,143 sq mi (109,247 km2)
    • Land 41,217 sq mi (106,846 km2)
    • Water 926 sq mi (2,401 km2) 2.2%
    • Rank 36th
    Dimensions
    • Length 440 mi (710 km)
    • Width 120 mi (195 km)
    Elevation 900 ft (270 m)
    Highest elevation
    (Clingmans Dome[3][a])
    6,643 ft (2,025 m)
    Lowest elevation
    (Mississippi River at Mississippi border[3][a])
    178 ft (54 m)
    Population
    (2020)
    • Total 6,916,897[4]
    • Rank 16th
    • Density 167.8/sq mi (64.8/km2)
    • Rank 20th
    • Median household income $53,320[5]
    • Income rank 42nd
    Demonym(s) Tennessean
    Big Bender (archaic)
    Volunteer (historical significance)
    Language
    • Official language English
    • Spoken language Language spoken at home[6]
    English: 94.6%
    Spanish: 3.9%
    Other: 1.5%
    Time zones
    East Tennessee UTC−05:00 (Eastern)
    • Summer (DST) UTC−04:00 (EDT)
    Middle and West UTC−06:00 (Central)
    • Summer (DST) UTC−05:00 (CDT)
    USPS abbreviation
    TN
    ISO 3166 code US-TN
    Traditional abbreviation Tenn.
    Latitude 34°59′ N to 36°41′ N
    Longitude 81°39′ W to 90°19′ W
    Website www.tn.gov
    hideTennessee state symbols
    Flag of Tennessee.svg
    Flag of Tennessee
    Seal of Tennessee.svg
    Living insignia
    Amphibian Tennessee cave salamander
    Bird Mockingbird
    Bobwhite quail
    Butterfly Zebra swallowtail
    Fish Channel catfish
    Smallmouth bass
    Flower Iris
    Passion flower
    Tennessee echinacea
    Insect Firefly
    Lady beetle
    Honey bee
    Mammal Tennessee Walking Horse
    Raccoon
    Reptile Eastern box turtle
    Tree Tulip poplar
    Eastern red cedar
    Inanimate insignia
    Beverage Milk
    Dance Square dance
    Firearm Barrett M82
    Food Tomato
    Fossil Pterotrigonia (Scabrotrigonia) thoracica
    Gemstone Tennessee River pearl
    Mineral Agate
    Poem "Oh Tennessee, My Tennessee" by William Lawrence
    Rock Limestone
    Slogan "Tennessee—America at its best"
    Tartan Tennessee State Tartan
    State route marker
    Tennessee state route marker
    State quarter
    Tennessee quarter dollar coin
    Released in 2002
    Lists of United States state symbols
    Tennessee (/ˌtɛnɪˈsiː/ (audio speaker iconlisten) TEN-ih-SEE, locally /ˈtɛnɪsi/ TEN-iss-ee),[7][8][9] officially the State of Tennessee, is a state in the Southeastern region of the United States. Tennessee is the 36th largest by area and the 16th most populous of the 50 states. It is bordered by Kentucky to the north, Virginia to the northeast, North Carolina to the east, Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi to the south, Arkansas to the southwest, and Missouri to the northwest. Tennessee is geographically, culturally, and legally divided into three Grand Divisions of East, Middle, and West Tennessee. Nashville is the state's capital and largest city, and anchors its largest metropolitan area. Other major cities include Memphis, Knoxville, Chattanooga, and Clarksville. Tennessee's population as of the 2020 United States census is approximately 6.9 million.[10]

    Tennessee is rooted in the Watauga Association, a 1772 frontier pact generally regarded as the first constitutional government west of the Appalachian Mountains.[11] Its name derives from "Tanasi", a Cherokee town in the eastern part of the state that existed before the first European American settlement.[12] Tennessee was initially part of North Carolina, and later the Southwest Territory, before its admission to the Union as the 16th state on June 1, 1796. It earned the nickname "The Volunteer State" early in its history due to a strong tradition of military service.[13] A slave state until the American Civil War, Tennessee was politically divided, with its western and middle parts supporting the Confederacy and the eastern region harboring pro-Union sentiment. As a result, Tennessee was the last state to secede and the first readmitted to the Union after the war.[14]

    During the 20th century, Tennessee transitioned from a predominantly agrarian society to a more diversified economy. This was aided in part by massive federal investment in the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and the city of Oak Ridge, which was established during World War II to house the Manhattan Project's uranium enrichment facilities for the construction of the world's first atomic bombs. These were dropped on Imperial Japan at the end of the war. After the war, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory became a key center of scientific research. In 2016, the element tennessine was named for the state, largely in recognition of the roles played by Oak Ridge, Vanderbilt University, and the University of Tennessee in its discovery.[15] Tennessee has also played a major role in the development of many forms of popular music, including country, blues, rock and roll, soul, and gospel.

    Tennessee has diverse terrain and landforms, and from east to west, contains a mix of cultural features characteristic of Appalachia, the Upland South, and the Deep South. The Blue Ridge Mountains along the eastern border reach some of the highest elevations in eastern North America, and the Cumberland Plateau contains many scenic valleys and waterfalls. The central part of the state is marked by cavernous bedrock and irregular rolling hills, and level, fertile plains define West Tennessee. The state is twice bisected by the Tennessee River, and the Mississippi River forms its western border. Its economy is dominated by the health care, music, finance, automotive, chemical, electronics, and tourism sectors, and cattle, soybeans, corn, poultry, and cotton are its primary agricultural products.[16] The Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the nation's most visited national park, is in eastern Tennessee.[17]

    Contents


    1 Etymology
    2 History
    2.1 Pre-European era
    2.2 Exploration and colonization
    2.3 Statehood and antebellum era
    2.4 Civil War
    2.5 Reconstruction and late 19th century
    2.6 Earlier 20th century
    2.7 Mid-20th century to present
    3 Geography
    3.1 Topography
    3.2 Hydrology
    3.3 Ecology
    3.4 Climate
    4 Cities, towns, and counties
    5 Demographics
    5.1 Ethnicity
    5.2 Religion
    6 Economy
    6.1 Taxation
    6.2 Agriculture
    6.3 Industry
    6.4 Business
    6.5 Energy and mineral production
    6.6 Tourism
    7 Culture
    7.1 Music
    8 Education
    8.1 Colleges and universities
    9 Media
    10 Transportation
    10.1 Roads
    10.2 Airports
    10.3 Railroads
    10.4 Waterways
    11 Law and government
    11.1 Executive and legislative branches
    11.2 Judicial system
    11.3 Local
    11.4 Federal
    11.5 Tribal
    12 Politics
    13 Sports
    14 See also
    15 Notes
    16 References
    16.1 Citations
    16.2 Bibliography
    17 Further reading
    18 External links
    Etymology

    Main article: Name of Tennessee
    Tennessee derives its name most directly from the Cherokee town of Tanasi (or "Tanase", in syllabary: ᏔᎾᏏ) in present-day Monroe County, Tennessee, on the Tanasi River, now known as the Little Tennessee River. This town appeared on British maps as early as 1725. In 1567, Spanish explorer Captain Juan Pardo and his men encountered a Native American village named "Tanasqui" in the area while traveling inland from modern-day South Carolina; however, it is unknown if this was the same settlement as Tanasi.[b] Recent research suggests that the Cherokees adapted the name from the Yuchi word Tana-tsee-dgee, meaning "brother-waters-place" or "where-the-waters-meet."[19][20][21] The modern spelling, Tennessee, is attributed to Governor James Glen of South Carolina, who used this spelling in his official correspondence during the 1750s. In 1788, North Carolina created "Tennessee County", and in 1796, a constitutional convention, organizing the new state out of the Southwest Territory, adopted "Tennessee" as the state's name.[22]

    Tennessee is about 2-3 hours south of me. I’ll drive down to confirm @GrundleStiltzkin’s report.
    1to392831weretakenGrundleStiltzkindOgmaster
  • whatshouldicareaboutwhatshouldicareabout Member Posts: 9,753
    10,000 Awesomes 10,000 Up Votes Eighth Anniversary 5000 Comments

    I didn't know there was a Tennessee State
    Tennessee
    This article is about the U.S. state. For the river, see Tennessee River. For other uses, see Tennessee (disambiguation).
    "Tenn" redirects here. For the Japanese MC, see Tenn (MC).
    Tennessee
    ᏔᎾᏏ (Cherokee)
    Tanasi
    State
    State of Tennessee
    Nickname(s):
    The Volunteer State[1]
    Motto(s):
    Agriculture and Commerce
    Anthem: Nine songs
    Map of the United States with Tennessee highlighted
    Map of the United States with Tennessee highlighted
    Country United States
    Before statehood Southwest Territory
    Admitted to the Union June 1, 1796 (16th)
    Capital
    (and largest city) Nashville[2]
    Largest metro and urban areas Greater Nashville (combined and metro)
    Memphis (urban)
    Government
    • Governor Bill Lee (R)
    • Lieutenant Governor Randy McNally (R)
    Legislature General Assembly
    • Upper house Senate
    • Lower house House of Representatives
    Judiciary Tennessee Supreme Court
    U.S. senators Marsha Blackburn (R)
    Bill Hagerty (R)
    U.S. House delegation 7 Republicans
    2 Democrats (list)
    Area
    • Total 42,143 sq mi (109,247 km2)
    • Land 41,217 sq mi (106,846 km2)
    • Water 926 sq mi (2,401 km2) 2.2%
    • Rank 36th
    Dimensions
    • Length 440 mi (710 km)
    • Width 120 mi (195 km)
    Elevation 900 ft (270 m)
    Highest elevation
    (Clingmans Dome[3][a])
    6,643 ft (2,025 m)
    Lowest elevation
    (Mississippi River at Mississippi border[3][a])
    178 ft (54 m)
    Population
    (2020)
    • Total 6,916,897[4]
    • Rank 16th
    • Density 167.8/sq mi (64.8/km2)
    • Rank 20th
    • Median household income $53,320[5]
    • Income rank 42nd
    Demonym(s) Tennessean
    Big Bender (archaic)
    Volunteer (historical significance)
    Language
    • Official language English
    • Spoken language Language spoken at home[6]
    English: 94.6%
    Spanish: 3.9%
    Other: 1.5%
    Time zones
    East Tennessee UTC−05:00 (Eastern)
    • Summer (DST) UTC−04:00 (EDT)
    Middle and West UTC−06:00 (Central)
    • Summer (DST) UTC−05:00 (CDT)
    USPS abbreviation
    TN
    ISO 3166 code US-TN
    Traditional abbreviation Tenn.
    Latitude 34°59′ N to 36°41′ N
    Longitude 81°39′ W to 90°19′ W
    Website www.tn.gov
    hideTennessee state symbols
    Flag of Tennessee.svg
    Flag of Tennessee
    Seal of Tennessee.svg
    Living insignia
    Amphibian Tennessee cave salamander
    Bird Mockingbird
    Bobwhite quail
    Butterfly Zebra swallowtail
    Fish Channel catfish
    Smallmouth bass
    Flower Iris
    Passion flower
    Tennessee echinacea
    Insect Firefly
    Lady beetle
    Honey bee
    Mammal Tennessee Walking Horse
    Raccoon
    Reptile Eastern box turtle
    Tree Tulip poplar
    Eastern red cedar
    Inanimate insignia
    Beverage Milk
    Dance Square dance
    Firearm Barrett M82
    Food Tomato
    Fossil Pterotrigonia (Scabrotrigonia) thoracica
    Gemstone Tennessee River pearl
    Mineral Agate
    Poem "Oh Tennessee, My Tennessee" by William Lawrence
    Rock Limestone
    Slogan "Tennessee—America at its best"
    Tartan Tennessee State Tartan
    State route marker
    Tennessee state route marker
    State quarter
    Tennessee quarter dollar coin
    Released in 2002
    Lists of United States state symbols
    Tennessee (/ˌtɛnɪˈsiː/ (audio speaker iconlisten) TEN-ih-SEE, locally /ˈtɛnɪsi/ TEN-iss-ee),[7][8][9] officially the State of Tennessee, is a state in the Southeastern region of the United States. Tennessee is the 36th largest by area and the 16th most populous of the 50 states. It is bordered by Kentucky to the north, Virginia to the northeast, North Carolina to the east, Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi to the south, Arkansas to the southwest, and Missouri to the northwest. Tennessee is geographically, culturally, and legally divided into three Grand Divisions of East, Middle, and West Tennessee. Nashville is the state's capital and largest city, and anchors its largest metropolitan area. Other major cities include Memphis, Knoxville, Chattanooga, and Clarksville. Tennessee's population as of the 2020 United States census is approximately 6.9 million.[10]

    Tennessee is rooted in the Watauga Association, a 1772 frontier pact generally regarded as the first constitutional government west of the Appalachian Mountains.[11] Its name derives from "Tanasi", a Cherokee town in the eastern part of the state that existed before the first European American settlement.[12] Tennessee was initially part of North Carolina, and later the Southwest Territory, before its admission to the Union as the 16th state on June 1, 1796. It earned the nickname "The Volunteer State" early in its history due to a strong tradition of military service.[13] A slave state until the American Civil War, Tennessee was politically divided, with its western and middle parts supporting the Confederacy and the eastern region harboring pro-Union sentiment. As a result, Tennessee was the last state to secede and the first readmitted to the Union after the war.[14]

    During the 20th century, Tennessee transitioned from a predominantly agrarian society to a more diversified economy. This was aided in part by massive federal investment in the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and the city of Oak Ridge, which was established during World War II to house the Manhattan Project's uranium enrichment facilities for the construction of the world's first atomic bombs. These were dropped on Imperial Japan at the end of the war. After the war, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory became a key center of scientific research. In 2016, the element tennessine was named for the state, largely in recognition of the roles played by Oak Ridge, Vanderbilt University, and the University of Tennessee in its discovery.[15] Tennessee has also played a major role in the development of many forms of popular music, including country, blues, rock and roll, soul, and gospel.

    Tennessee has diverse terrain and landforms, and from east to west, contains a mix of cultural features characteristic of Appalachia, the Upland South, and the Deep South. The Blue Ridge Mountains along the eastern border reach some of the highest elevations in eastern North America, and the Cumberland Plateau contains many scenic valleys and waterfalls. The central part of the state is marked by cavernous bedrock and irregular rolling hills, and level, fertile plains define West Tennessee. The state is twice bisected by the Tennessee River, and the Mississippi River forms its western border. Its economy is dominated by the health care, music, finance, automotive, chemical, electronics, and tourism sectors, and cattle, soybeans, corn, poultry, and cotton are its primary agricultural products.[16] The Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the nation's most visited national park, is in eastern Tennessee.[17]

    Contents


    1 Etymology
    2 History
    2.1 Pre-European era
    2.2 Exploration and colonization
    2.3 Statehood and antebellum era
    2.4 Civil War
    2.5 Reconstruction and late 19th century
    2.6 Earlier 20th century
    2.7 Mid-20th century to present
    3 Geography
    3.1 Topography
    3.2 Hydrology
    3.3 Ecology
    3.4 Climate
    4 Cities, towns, and counties
    5 Demographics
    5.1 Ethnicity
    5.2 Religion
    6 Economy
    6.1 Taxation
    6.2 Agriculture
    6.3 Industry
    6.4 Business
    6.5 Energy and mineral production
    6.6 Tourism
    7 Culture
    7.1 Music
    8 Education
    8.1 Colleges and universities
    9 Media
    10 Transportation
    10.1 Roads
    10.2 Airports
    10.3 Railroads
    10.4 Waterways
    11 Law and government
    11.1 Executive and legislative branches
    11.2 Judicial system
    11.3 Local
    11.4 Federal
    11.5 Tribal
    12 Politics
    13 Sports
    14 See also
    15 Notes
    16 References
    16.1 Citations
    16.2 Bibliography
    17 Further reading
    18 External links
    Etymology

    Main article: Name of Tennessee
    Tennessee derives its name most directly from the Cherokee town of Tanasi (or "Tanase", in syllabary: ᏔᎾᏏ) in present-day Monroe County, Tennessee, on the Tanasi River, now known as the Little Tennessee River. This town appeared on British maps as early as 1725. In 1567, Spanish explorer Captain Juan Pardo and his men encountered a Native American village named "Tanasqui" in the area while traveling inland from modern-day South Carolina; however, it is unknown if this was the same settlement as Tanasi.[b] Recent research suggests that the Cherokees adapted the name from the Yuchi word Tana-tsee-dgee, meaning "brother-waters-place" or "where-the-waters-meet."[19][20][21] The modern spelling, Tennessee, is attributed to Governor James Glen of South Carolina, who used this spelling in his official correspondence during the 1750s. In 1788, North Carolina created "Tennessee County", and in 1796, a constitutional convention, organizing the new state out of the Southwest Territory, adopted "Tennessee" as the state's name.[22]

    Disagree
    GrundleStiltzkinJoeEDangerously1to392831weretaken
  • dannarcdannarc Member Posts: 1,220
    1,500 Awesomes 250 Answers 1000 Comments 500 Up Votes

    I didn't know there was a Tennessee State
    Tennessee
    This article is about the U.S. state. For the river, see Tennessee River. For other uses, see Tennessee (disambiguation).
    "Tenn" redirects here. For the Japanese MC, see Tenn (MC).
    Tennessee
    ᏔᎾᏏ (Cherokee)
    Tanasi
    State
    State of Tennessee
    Nickname(s):
    The Volunteer State[1]
    Motto(s):
    Agriculture and Commerce
    Anthem: Nine songs
    Map of the United States with Tennessee highlighted
    Map of the United States with Tennessee highlighted
    Country United States
    Before statehood Southwest Territory
    Admitted to the Union June 1, 1796 (16th)
    Capital
    (and largest city) Nashville[2]
    Largest metro and urban areas Greater Nashville (combined and metro)
    Memphis (urban)
    Government
    • Governor Bill Lee (R)
    • Lieutenant Governor Randy McNally (R)
    Legislature General Assembly
    • Upper house Senate
    • Lower house House of Representatives
    Judiciary Tennessee Supreme Court
    U.S. senators Marsha Blackburn (R)
    Bill Hagerty (R)
    U.S. House delegation 7 Republicans
    2 Democrats (list)
    Area
    • Total 42,143 sq mi (109,247 km2)
    • Land 41,217 sq mi (106,846 km2)
    • Water 926 sq mi (2,401 km2) 2.2%
    • Rank 36th
    Dimensions
    • Length 440 mi (710 km)
    • Width 120 mi (195 km)
    Elevation 900 ft (270 m)
    Highest elevation
    (Clingmans Dome[3][a])
    6,643 ft (2,025 m)
    Lowest elevation
    (Mississippi River at Mississippi border[3][a])
    178 ft (54 m)
    Population
    (2020)
    • Total 6,916,897[4]
    • Rank 16th
    • Density 167.8/sq mi (64.8/km2)
    • Rank 20th
    • Median household income $53,320[5]
    • Income rank 42nd
    Demonym(s) Tennessean
    Big Bender (archaic)
    Volunteer (historical significance)
    Language
    • Official language English
    • Spoken language Language spoken at home[6]
    English: 94.6%
    Spanish: 3.9%
    Other: 1.5%
    Time zones
    East Tennessee UTC−05:00 (Eastern)
    • Summer (DST) UTC−04:00 (EDT)
    Middle and West UTC−06:00 (Central)
    • Summer (DST) UTC−05:00 (CDT)
    USPS abbreviation
    TN
    ISO 3166 code US-TN
    Traditional abbreviation Tenn.
    Latitude 34°59′ N to 36°41′ N
    Longitude 81°39′ W to 90°19′ W
    Website www.tn.gov
    hideTennessee state symbols
    Flag of Tennessee.svg
    Flag of Tennessee
    Seal of Tennessee.svg
    Living insignia
    Amphibian Tennessee cave salamander
    Bird Mockingbird
    Bobwhite quail
    Butterfly Zebra swallowtail
    Fish Channel catfish
    Smallmouth bass
    Flower Iris
    Passion flower
    Tennessee echinacea
    Insect Firefly
    Lady beetle
    Honey bee
    Mammal Tennessee Walking Horse
    Raccoon
    Reptile Eastern box turtle
    Tree Tulip poplar
    Eastern red cedar
    Inanimate insignia
    Beverage Milk
    Dance Square dance
    Firearm Barrett M82
    Food Tomato
    Fossil Pterotrigonia (Scabrotrigonia) thoracica
    Gemstone Tennessee River pearl
    Mineral Agate
    Poem "Oh Tennessee, My Tennessee" by William Lawrence
    Rock Limestone
    Slogan "Tennessee—America at its best"
    Tartan Tennessee State Tartan
    State route marker
    Tennessee state route marker
    State quarter
    Tennessee quarter dollar coin
    Released in 2002
    Lists of United States state symbols
    Tennessee (/ˌtɛnɪˈsiː/ (audio speaker iconlisten) TEN-ih-SEE, locally /ˈtɛnɪsi/ TEN-iss-ee),[7][8][9] officially the State of Tennessee, is a state in the Southeastern region of the United States. Tennessee is the 36th largest by area and the 16th most populous of the 50 states. It is bordered by Kentucky to the north, Virginia to the northeast, North Carolina to the east, Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi to the south, Arkansas to the southwest, and Missouri to the northwest. Tennessee is geographically, culturally, and legally divided into three Grand Divisions of East, Middle, and West Tennessee. Nashville is the state's capital and largest city, and anchors its largest metropolitan area. Other major cities include Memphis, Knoxville, Chattanooga, and Clarksville. Tennessee's population as of the 2020 United States census is approximately 6.9 million.[10]

    Tennessee is rooted in the Watauga Association, a 1772 frontier pact generally regarded as the first constitutional government west of the Appalachian Mountains.[11] Its name derives from "Tanasi", a Cherokee town in the eastern part of the state that existed before the first European American settlement.[12] Tennessee was initially part of North Carolina, and later the Southwest Territory, before its admission to the Union as the 16th state on June 1, 1796. It earned the nickname "The Volunteer State" early in its history due to a strong tradition of military service.[13] A slave state until the American Civil War, Tennessee was politically divided, with its western and middle parts supporting the Confederacy and the eastern region harboring pro-Union sentiment. As a result, Tennessee was the last state to secede and the first readmitted to the Union after the war.[14]

    During the 20th century, Tennessee transitioned from a predominantly agrarian society to a more diversified economy. This was aided in part by massive federal investment in the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and the city of Oak Ridge, which was established during World War II to house the Manhattan Project's uranium enrichment facilities for the construction of the world's first atomic bombs. These were dropped on Imperial Japan at the end of the war. After the war, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory became a key center of scientific research. In 2016, the element tennessine was named for the state, largely in recognition of the roles played by Oak Ridge, Vanderbilt University, and the University of Tennessee in its discovery.[15] Tennessee has also played a major role in the development of many forms of popular music, including country, blues, rock and roll, soul, and gospel.

    Tennessee has diverse terrain and landforms, and from east to west, contains a mix of cultural features characteristic of Appalachia, the Upland South, and the Deep South. The Blue Ridge Mountains along the eastern border reach some of the highest elevations in eastern North America, and the Cumberland Plateau contains many scenic valleys and waterfalls. The central part of the state is marked by cavernous bedrock and irregular rolling hills, and level, fertile plains define West Tennessee. The state is twice bisected by the Tennessee River, and the Mississippi River forms its western border. Its economy is dominated by the health care, music, finance, automotive, chemical, electronics, and tourism sectors, and cattle, soybeans, corn, poultry, and cotton are its primary agricultural products.[16] The Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the nation's most visited national park, is in eastern Tennessee.[17]

    Contents


    1 Etymology
    2 History
    2.1 Pre-European era
    2.2 Exploration and colonization
    2.3 Statehood and antebellum era
    2.4 Civil War
    2.5 Reconstruction and late 19th century
    2.6 Earlier 20th century
    2.7 Mid-20th century to present
    3 Geography
    3.1 Topography
    3.2 Hydrology
    3.3 Ecology
    3.4 Climate
    4 Cities, towns, and counties
    5 Demographics
    5.1 Ethnicity
    5.2 Religion
    6 Economy
    6.1 Taxation
    6.2 Agriculture
    6.3 Industry
    6.4 Business
    6.5 Energy and mineral production
    6.6 Tourism
    7 Culture
    7.1 Music
    8 Education
    8.1 Colleges and universities
    9 Media
    10 Transportation
    10.1 Roads
    10.2 Airports
    10.3 Railroads
    10.4 Waterways
    11 Law and government
    11.1 Executive and legislative branches
    11.2 Judicial system
    11.3 Local
    11.4 Federal
    11.5 Tribal
    12 Politics
    13 Sports
    14 See also
    15 Notes
    16 References
    16.1 Citations
    16.2 Bibliography
    17 Further reading
    18 External links
    Etymology

    Main article: Name of Tennessee
    Tennessee derives its name most directly from the Cherokee town of Tanasi (or "Tanase", in syllabary: ᏔᎾᏏ) in present-day Monroe County, Tennessee, on the Tanasi River, now known as the Little Tennessee River. This town appeared on British maps as early as 1725. In 1567, Spanish explorer Captain Juan Pardo and his men encountered a Native American village named "Tanasqui" in the area while traveling inland from modern-day South Carolina; however, it is unknown if this was the same settlement as Tanasi.[b] Recent research suggests that the Cherokees adapted the name from the Yuchi word Tana-tsee-dgee, meaning "brother-waters-place" or "where-the-waters-meet."[19][20][21] The modern spelling, Tennessee, is attributed to Governor James Glen of South Carolina, who used this spelling in his official correspondence during the 1750s. In 1788, North Carolina created "Tennessee County", and in 1796, a constitutional convention, organizing the new state out of the Southwest Territory, adopted "Tennessee" as the state's name.[22]


    TLDR
  • TurdBomberTurdBomber Member Posts: 16,743
    10,000 Up Votes Standard Supporter 10,000 Awesomes 10000 Comments
    More Placenta, please.
  • rodmansragerodmansrage Member, Swaye's Wigwam Posts: 4,258
    Swaye's Wigwam 5,000 Awesomes Eighth Anniversary 2,500 Up Votes

    I didn't know there was a Tennessee State
    Tennessee
    This article is about the U.S. state. For the river, see Tennessee River. For other uses, see Tennessee (disambiguation).
    "Tenn" redirects here. For the Japanese MC, see Tenn (MC).
    Tennessee
    ᏔᎾᏏ (Cherokee)
    Tanasi
    State
    State of Tennessee
    Nickname(s):
    The Volunteer State[1]
    Motto(s):
    Agriculture and Commerce
    Anthem: Nine songs
    Map of the United States with Tennessee highlighted
    Map of the United States with Tennessee highlighted
    Country United States
    Before statehood Southwest Territory
    Admitted to the Union June 1, 1796 (16th)
    Capital
    (and largest city) Nashville[2]
    Largest metro and urban areas Greater Nashville (combined and metro)
    Memphis (urban)
    Government
    • Governor Bill Lee (R)
    • Lieutenant Governor Randy McNally (R)
    Legislature General Assembly
    • Upper house Senate
    • Lower house House of Representatives
    Judiciary Tennessee Supreme Court
    U.S. senators Marsha Blackburn (R)
    Bill Hagerty (R)
    U.S. House delegation 7 Republicans
    2 Democrats (list)
    Area
    • Total 42,143 sq mi (109,247 km2)
    • Land 41,217 sq mi (106,846 km2)
    • Water 926 sq mi (2,401 km2) 2.2%
    • Rank 36th
    Dimensions
    • Length 440 mi (710 km)
    • Width 120 mi (195 km)
    Elevation 900 ft (270 m)
    Highest elevation
    (Clingmans Dome[3][a])
    6,643 ft (2,025 m)
    Lowest elevation
    (Mississippi River at Mississippi border[3][a])
    178 ft (54 m)
    Population
    (2020)
    • Total 6,916,897[4]
    • Rank 16th
    • Density 167.8/sq mi (64.8/km2)
    • Rank 20th
    • Median household income $53,320[5]
    • Income rank 42nd
    Demonym(s) Tennessean
    Big Bender (archaic)
    Volunteer (historical significance)
    Language
    • Official language English
    • Spoken language Language spoken at home[6]
    English: 94.6%
    Spanish: 3.9%
    Other: 1.5%
    Time zones
    East Tennessee UTC−05:00 (Eastern)
    • Summer (DST) UTC−04:00 (EDT)
    Middle and West UTC−06:00 (Central)
    • Summer (DST) UTC−05:00 (CDT)
    USPS abbreviation
    TN
    ISO 3166 code US-TN
    Traditional abbreviation Tenn.
    Latitude 34°59′ N to 36°41′ N
    Longitude 81°39′ W to 90°19′ W
    Website www.tn.gov
    hideTennessee state symbols
    Flag of Tennessee.svg
    Flag of Tennessee
    Seal of Tennessee.svg
    Living insignia
    Amphibian Tennessee cave salamander
    Bird Mockingbird
    Bobwhite quail
    Butterfly Zebra swallowtail
    Fish Channel catfish
    Smallmouth bass
    Flower Iris
    Passion flower
    Tennessee echinacea
    Insect Firefly
    Lady beetle
    Honey bee
    Mammal Tennessee Walking Horse
    Raccoon
    Reptile Eastern box turtle
    Tree Tulip poplar
    Eastern red cedar
    Inanimate insignia
    Beverage Milk
    Dance Square dance
    Firearm Barrett M82
    Food Tomato
    Fossil Pterotrigonia (Scabrotrigonia) thoracica
    Gemstone Tennessee River pearl
    Mineral Agate
    Poem "Oh Tennessee, My Tennessee" by William Lawrence
    Rock Limestone
    Slogan "Tennessee—America at its best"
    Tartan Tennessee State Tartan
    State route marker
    Tennessee state route marker
    State quarter
    Tennessee quarter dollar coin
    Released in 2002
    Lists of United States state symbols
    Tennessee (/ˌtɛnɪˈsiː/ (audio speaker iconlisten) TEN-ih-SEE, locally /ˈtɛnɪsi/ TEN-iss-ee),[7][8][9] officially the State of Tennessee, is a state in the Southeastern region of the United States. Tennessee is the 36th largest by area and the 16th most populous of the 50 states. It is bordered by Kentucky to the north, Virginia to the northeast, North Carolina to the east, Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi to the south, Arkansas to the southwest, and Missouri to the northwest. Tennessee is geographically, culturally, and legally divided into three Grand Divisions of East, Middle, and West Tennessee. Nashville is the state's capital and largest city, and anchors its largest metropolitan area. Other major cities include Memphis, Knoxville, Chattanooga, and Clarksville. Tennessee's population as of the 2020 United States census is approximately 6.9 million.[10]

    Tennessee is rooted in the Watauga Association, a 1772 frontier pact generally regarded as the first constitutional government west of the Appalachian Mountains.[11] Its name derives from "Tanasi", a Cherokee town in the eastern part of the state that existed before the first European American settlement.[12] Tennessee was initially part of North Carolina, and later the Southwest Territory, before its admission to the Union as the 16th state on June 1, 1796. It earned the nickname "The Volunteer State" early in its history due to a strong tradition of military service.[13] A slave state until the American Civil War, Tennessee was politically divided, with its western and middle parts supporting the Confederacy and the eastern region harboring pro-Union sentiment. As a result, Tennessee was the last state to secede and the first readmitted to the Union after the war.[14]

    During the 20th century, Tennessee transitioned from a predominantly agrarian society to a more diversified economy. This was aided in part by massive federal investment in the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and the city of Oak Ridge, which was established during World War II to house the Manhattan Project's uranium enrichment facilities for the construction of the world's first atomic bombs. These were dropped on Imperial Japan at the end of the war. After the war, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory became a key center of scientific research. In 2016, the element tennessine was named for the state, largely in recognition of the roles played by Oak Ridge, Vanderbilt University, and the University of Tennessee in its discovery.[15] Tennessee has also played a major role in the development of many forms of popular music, including country, blues, rock and roll, soul, and gospel.

    Tennessee has diverse terrain and landforms, and from east to west, contains a mix of cultural features characteristic of Appalachia, the Upland South, and the Deep South. The Blue Ridge Mountains along the eastern border reach some of the highest elevations in eastern North America, and the Cumberland Plateau contains many scenic valleys and waterfalls. The central part of the state is marked by cavernous bedrock and irregular rolling hills, and level, fertile plains define West Tennessee. The state is twice bisected by the Tennessee River, and the Mississippi River forms its western border. Its economy is dominated by the health care, music, finance, automotive, chemical, electronics, and tourism sectors, and cattle, soybeans, corn, poultry, and cotton are its primary agricultural products.[16] The Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the nation's most visited national park, is in eastern Tennessee.[17]

    Contents


    1 Etymology
    2 History
    2.1 Pre-European era
    2.2 Exploration and colonization
    2.3 Statehood and antebellum era
    2.4 Civil War
    2.5 Reconstruction and late 19th century
    2.6 Earlier 20th century
    2.7 Mid-20th century to present
    3 Geography
    3.1 Topography
    3.2 Hydrology
    3.3 Ecology
    3.4 Climate
    4 Cities, towns, and counties
    5 Demographics
    5.1 Ethnicity
    5.2 Religion
    6 Economy
    6.1 Taxation
    6.2 Agriculture
    6.3 Industry
    6.4 Business
    6.5 Energy and mineral production
    6.6 Tourism
    7 Culture
    7.1 Music
    8 Education
    8.1 Colleges and universities
    9 Media
    10 Transportation
    10.1 Roads
    10.2 Airports
    10.3 Railroads
    10.4 Waterways
    11 Law and government
    11.1 Executive and legislative branches
    11.2 Judicial system
    11.3 Local
    11.4 Federal
    11.5 Tribal
    12 Politics
    13 Sports
    14 See also
    15 Notes
    16 References
    16.1 Citations
    16.2 Bibliography
    17 Further reading
    18 External links
    Etymology

    Main article: Name of Tennessee
    Tennessee derives its name most directly from the Cherokee town of Tanasi (or "Tanase", in syllabary: ᏔᎾᏏ) in present-day Monroe County, Tennessee, on the Tanasi River, now known as the Little Tennessee River. This town appeared on British maps as early as 1725. In 1567, Spanish explorer Captain Juan Pardo and his men encountered a Native American village named "Tanasqui" in the area while traveling inland from modern-day South Carolina; however, it is unknown if this was the same settlement as Tanasi.[b] Recent research suggests that the Cherokees adapted the name from the Yuchi word Tana-tsee-dgee, meaning "brother-waters-place" or "where-the-waters-meet."[19][20][21] The modern spelling, Tennessee, is attributed to Governor James Glen of South Carolina, who used this spelling in his official correspondence during the 1750s. In 1788, North Carolina created "Tennessee County", and in 1796, a constitutional convention, organizing the new state out of the Southwest Territory, adopted "Tennessee" as the state's name.[22]

    I didn't know there was a Tennessee State
    Tennessee
    This article is about the U.S. state. For the river, see Tennessee River. For other uses, see Tennessee (disambiguation).
    "Tenn" redirects here. For the Japanese MC, see Tenn (MC).
    Tennessee
    ᏔᎾᏏ (Cherokee)
    Tanasi
    State
    State of Tennessee
    Nickname(s):
    The Volunteer State[1]
    Motto(s):
    Agriculture and Commerce
    Anthem: Nine songs
    Map of the United States with Tennessee highlighted
    Map of the United States with Tennessee highlighted
    Country United States
    Before statehood Southwest Territory
    Admitted to the Union June 1, 1796 (16th)
    Capital
    (and largest city) Nashville[2]
    Largest metro and urban areas Greater Nashville (combined and metro)
    Memphis (urban)
    Government
    • Governor Bill Lee (R)
    • Lieutenant Governor Randy McNally (R)
    Legislature General Assembly
    • Upper house Senate
    • Lower house House of Representatives
    Judiciary Tennessee Supreme Court
    U.S. senators Marsha Blackburn (R)
    Bill Hagerty (R)
    U.S. House delegation 7 Republicans
    2 Democrats (list)
    Area
    • Total 42,143 sq mi (109,247 km2)
    • Land 41,217 sq mi (106,846 km2)
    • Water 926 sq mi (2,401 km2) 2.2%
    • Rank 36th
    Dimensions
    • Length 440 mi (710 km)
    • Width 120 mi (195 km)
    Elevation 900 ft (270 m)
    Highest elevation
    (Clingmans Dome[3][a])
    6,643 ft (2,025 m)
    Lowest elevation
    (Mississippi River at Mississippi border[3][a])
    178 ft (54 m)
    Population
    (2020)
    • Total 6,916,897[4]
    • Rank 16th
    • Density 167.8/sq mi (64.8/km2)
    • Rank 20th
    • Median household income $53,320[5]
    • Income rank 42nd
    Demonym(s) Tennessean
    Big Bender (archaic)
    Volunteer (historical significance)
    Language
    • Official language English
    • Spoken language Language spoken at home[6]
    English: 94.6%
    Spanish: 3.9%
    Other: 1.5%
    Time zones
    East Tennessee UTC−05:00 (Eastern)
    • Summer (DST) UTC−04:00 (EDT)
    Middle and West UTC−06:00 (Central)
    • Summer (DST) UTC−05:00 (CDT)
    USPS abbreviation
    TN
    ISO 3166 code US-TN
    Traditional abbreviation Tenn.
    Latitude 34°59′ N to 36°41′ N
    Longitude 81°39′ W to 90°19′ W
    Website www.tn.gov
    hideTennessee state symbols
    Flag of Tennessee.svg
    Flag of Tennessee
    Seal of Tennessee.svg
    Living insignia
    Amphibian Tennessee cave salamander
    Bird Mockingbird
    Bobwhite quail
    Butterfly Zebra swallowtail
    Fish Channel catfish
    Smallmouth bass
    Flower Iris
    Passion flower
    Tennessee echinacea
    Insect Firefly
    Lady beetle
    Honey bee
    Mammal Tennessee Walking Horse
    Raccoon
    Reptile Eastern box turtle
    Tree Tulip poplar
    Eastern red cedar
    Inanimate insignia
    Beverage Milk
    Dance Square dance
    Firearm Barrett M82
    Food Tomato
    Fossil Pterotrigonia (Scabrotrigonia) thoracica
    Gemstone Tennessee River pearl
    Mineral Agate
    Poem "Oh Tennessee, My Tennessee" by William Lawrence
    Rock Limestone
    Slogan "Tennessee—America at its best"
    Tartan Tennessee State Tartan
    State route marker
    Tennessee state route marker
    State quarter
    Tennessee quarter dollar coin
    Released in 2002
    Lists of United States state symbols
    Tennessee (/ˌtɛnɪˈsiː/ (audio speaker iconlisten) TEN-ih-SEE, locally /ˈtɛnɪsi/ TEN-iss-ee),[7][8][9] officially the State of Tennessee, is a state in the Southeastern region of the United States. Tennessee is the 36th largest by area and the 16th most populous of the 50 states. It is bordered by Kentucky to the north, Virginia to the northeast, North Carolina to the east, Georgia, Alabama, and Mississippi to the south, Arkansas to the southwest, and Missouri to the northwest. Tennessee is geographically, culturally, and legally divided into three Grand Divisions of East, Middle, and West Tennessee. Nashville is the state's capital and largest city, and anchors its largest metropolitan area. Other major cities include Memphis, Knoxville, Chattanooga, and Clarksville. Tennessee's population as of the 2020 United States census is approximately 6.9 million.[10]

    Tennessee is rooted in the Watauga Association, a 1772 frontier pact generally regarded as the first constitutional government west of the Appalachian Mountains.[11] Its name derives from "Tanasi", a Cherokee town in the eastern part of the state that existed before the first European American settlement.[12] Tennessee was initially part of North Carolina, and later the Southwest Territory, before its admission to the Union as the 16th state on June 1, 1796. It earned the nickname "The Volunteer State" early in its history due to a strong tradition of military service.[13] A slave state until the American Civil War, Tennessee was politically divided, with its western and middle parts supporting the Confederacy and the eastern region harboring pro-Union sentiment. As a result, Tennessee was the last state to secede and the first readmitted to the Union after the war.[14]

    During the 20th century, Tennessee transitioned from a predominantly agrarian society to a more diversified economy. This was aided in part by massive federal investment in the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) and the city of Oak Ridge, which was established during World War II to house the Manhattan Project's uranium enrichment facilities for the construction of the world's first atomic bombs. These were dropped on Imperial Japan at the end of the war. After the war, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory became a key center of scientific research. In 2016, the element tennessine was named for the state, largely in recognition of the roles played by Oak Ridge, Vanderbilt University, and the University of Tennessee in its discovery.[15] Tennessee has also played a major role in the development of many forms of popular music, including country, blues, rock and roll, soul, and gospel.

    Tennessee has diverse terrain and landforms, and from east to west, contains a mix of cultural features characteristic of Appalachia, the Upland South, and the Deep South. The Blue Ridge Mountains along the eastern border reach some of the highest elevations in eastern North America, and the Cumberland Plateau contains many scenic valleys and waterfalls. The central part of the state is marked by cavernous bedrock and irregular rolling hills, and level, fertile plains define West Tennessee. The state is twice bisected by the Tennessee River, and the Mississippi River forms its western border. Its economy is dominated by the health care, music, finance, automotive, chemical, electronics, and tourism sectors, and cattle, soybeans, corn, poultry, and cotton are its primary agricultural products.[16] The Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the nation's most visited national park, is in eastern Tennessee.[17]

    Contents


    1 Etymology
    2 History
    2.1 Pre-European era
    2.2 Exploration and colonization
    2.3 Statehood and antebellum era
    2.4 Civil War
    2.5 Reconstruction and late 19th century
    2.6 Earlier 20th century
    2.7 Mid-20th century to present
    3 Geography
    3.1 Topography
    3.2 Hydrology
    3.3 Ecology
    3.4 Climate
    4 Cities, towns, and counties
    5 Demographics
    5.1 Ethnicity
    5.2 Religion
    6 Economy
    6.1 Taxation
    6.2 Agriculture
    6.3 Industry
    6.4 Business
    6.5 Energy and mineral production
    6.6 Tourism
    7 Culture
    7.1 Music
    8 Education
    8.1 Colleges and universities
    9 Media
    10 Transportation
    10.1 Roads
    10.2 Airports
    10.3 Railroads
    10.4 Waterways
    11 Law and government
    11.1 Executive and legislative branches
    11.2 Judicial system
    11.3 Local
    11.4 Federal
    11.5 Tribal
    12 Politics
    13 Sports
    14 See also
    15 Notes
    16 References
    16.1 Citations
    16.2 Bibliography
    17 Further reading
    18 External links
    Etymology

    Main article: Name of Tennessee
    Tennessee derives its name most directly from the Cherokee town of Tanasi (or "Tanase", in syllabary: ᏔᎾᏏ) in present-day Monroe County, Tennessee, on the Tanasi River, now known as the Little Tennessee River. This town appeared on British maps as early as 1725. In 1567, Spanish explorer Captain Juan Pardo and his men encountered a Native American village named "Tanasqui" in the area while traveling inland from modern-day South Carolina; however, it is unknown if this was the same settlement as Tanasi.[b] Recent research suggests that the Cherokees adapted the name from the Yuchi word Tana-tsee-dgee, meaning "brother-waters-place" or "where-the-waters-meet."[19][20][21] The modern spelling, Tennessee, is attributed to Governor James Glen of South Carolina, who used this spelling in his official correspondence during the 1750s. In 1788, North Carolina created "Tennessee County", and in 1796, a constitutional convention, organizing the new state out of the Southwest Territory, adopted "Tennessee" as the state's name.[22]

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