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Welcome to the Hardcore Husky Forums. Folks who are well-known in Cyberland and not that dumb.

DeFi

UW_Doog_BotUW_Doog_Bot Member, Swaye's Wigwam Posts: 10,741
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Started to dip my toes into DeFi and crypto liquidity pools these last few weeks. Absolutely bonkers returns out there(1,000% apy+) but obviously volatility at the high end of the return scale. Still, tons of nice returns in liquidity for stable coins which if you are scared of those why are you even reading this thread?

Considering liquidating the rest of my money market funds to swap for stable coin pools(20%+ APY). I'm looking at the potential for decentralized finance and think we are just playing with the tip at this point.


Comments

  • louism2washlouism2wash Member Posts: 212
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    Yeah, the price action in crypto is bonkers but it's also the wild west. I was getting sold on Bitcoin until I found out about Tether. If the biggest, most popular coin can have this gigantic hole in the fundamentals of the market then any of the coins can have this hole. It's still way too crazy for me.

    UW_Doog_Bot
  • UW_Doog_BotUW_Doog_Bot Member, Swaye's Wigwam Posts: 10,741
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    Yeah, the price action in crypto is bonkers but it's also the wild west. I was getting sold on Bitcoin until I found out about Tether. If the biggest, most popular coin can have this gigantic hole in the fundamentals of the market then any of the coins can have this hole. It's still way too crazy for me.

    Who owns Tether in place of BTC? People in crypto trusts and pools etc? Maybe I'm just ignorant of a layer of investment but all of my btc and crypto are owned directly and not as derivatives etc. I own a small amount of Tether but nothing that would effect my portfolio even if it tanked.

    You can argue that it's endemic and toxic to the whole crypto market but no more so than the fed printing dollars is inflating the price. Tether has a cap of $60B vs. BTC has a cap of $750B so even if a shell game is happening it still isn't one that seems like it would destroy the total value of BTC.

    @sonics1993 bump into this thred btw.
    DerekJohnson
  • BleachedAnusDawgBleachedAnusDawg Member Posts: 6,621
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    I thought Tether was an even bigger pyramid scheme than Bitcoin? Pretty sure I have read several articles about lawsuits, too.
  • UW_Doog_BotUW_Doog_Bot Member, Swaye's Wigwam Posts: 10,741
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    I thought Tether was an even bigger pyramid scheme than Bitcoin? Pretty sure I have read several articles about lawsuits, too.

    I think Tether is definitely dodgy which is why my portfolio has very little of it (from being in a liquidity pool no less). The argument revolves around if Tether is big enough(and bad enough) to take down the rest of the crypto market.

    Crypto is definitely the wild west. If you are an Old and want basic returns and traditional security then what cunt would click on this thred?

    If you are young, a first mover, and/or not risk averse then it's an interesting space to be experimenting in.
  • RaceBannonRaceBannon Member, Swaye's Wigwam Posts: 81,544
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    The house always wins. Warren on board to protect the establishment. Defi in the cross hairs

    MikeDamone
  • UW_Doog_BotUW_Doog_Bot Member, Swaye's Wigwam Posts: 10,741
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    The house always wins. Warren on board to protect the establishment. Defi in the cross hairs

    Lol it's fine if they want 1/1062 of crypto profits.
  • greenbloodgreenblood Member Posts: 13,396
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    The house always wins. Warren on board to protect the establishment. Defi in the cross hairs

    Lol it's fine if they want 1/1062 of crypto profits.
    Believe it or not, I think they are most worried about crypto stable coins
    UW_Doog_Bot
  • RaceBannonRaceBannon Member, Swaye's Wigwam Posts: 81,544
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    There was a thread here wondering why crypto guys were saying Warren was a tool of big banking

    Just a follow up on that

    1to392831weretaken
  • UW_Doog_BotUW_Doog_Bot Member, Swaye's Wigwam Posts: 10,741
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    There was a thread here wondering why crypto guys were saying Warren was a tool of big banking

    Just a follow up on that

    She is. What the average low IQ dem liberal doesn't realize is that the big banks embrace higher regulatory oversight. It creates barriers to competition and helps eliminate the "not too big to fail" banks.
    RaceBannon1to392831weretakenPurpleThrobberpawz
  • RaceBannonRaceBannon Member, Swaye's Wigwam Posts: 81,544
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    Rule 1

    Regulations help the big guy and crush the little guy. It's science. The big guys pay for the regulations they want
    UW_Doog_Bot1to392831weretakenpawz
  • GreenRiverGatorzGreenRiverGatorz Member, Swaye's Wigwam Posts: 9,041
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    Rule 1

    Regulations help the big guy and crush the little guy. It's science. The big guys pay for the regulations they want

    That's a dumb oversimplification. Especially when repealing regulation is what gave us the TBTFs in the first place.
    ntxduck1to392831weretakendoogieUW_Doog_Botpawz
  • greenbloodgreenblood Member Posts: 13,396
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    edited August 2021

    Rule 1

    Regulations help the big guy and crush the little guy. It's science. The big guys pay for the regulations they want

    That's a dumb oversimplification. Especially when repealing regulation is what gave us the TBTFs in the first place.
    I agree to a point. It isn't created to help the big guys, but it's generally the undesirable ending consequence. Regulations tend to be convoluted, and the big guys have the money and resources to find ways around them or take advantage of them, while the little guys don't.
  • RaceBannonRaceBannon Member, Swaye's Wigwam Posts: 81,544
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    Rule 1

    Regulations help the big guy and crush the little guy. It's science. The big guys pay for the regulations they want

    That's a dumb oversimplification. Especially when repealing regulation is what gave us the TBTFs in the first place.
    No

    It isn't
  • GreenRiverGatorzGreenRiverGatorz Member, Swaye's Wigwam Posts: 9,041
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    edited August 2021

    Rule 1

    Regulations help the big guy and crush the little guy. It's science. The big guys pay for the regulations they want

    That's a dumb oversimplification. Especially when repealing regulation is what gave us the TBTFs in the first place.
    I agree to a point. It isn't created to help the big guys, but it's generally the undesirable ending consequence. Regulations tend to be convoluted, and the big guys have the money and resources to find ways around them or take advantage of them, while the little guys don't.
    Sort of. Probably most of the time even. But still an oversimplification. In the Glass Steagall reference I alluded to, no amount of corporate wizardry was ever going to create conglomerates as large as the ones that emerged and held our economy hostage when that barrier was blown up. Smart regulation is hard, but it's not impossible.
    doogieUW_Doog_Bot
  • greenbloodgreenblood Member Posts: 13,396
    10,000 Awesomes 10,000 Up Votes Eighth Anniversary 10000 Comments
    edited August 2021

    Rule 1

    Regulations help the big guy and crush the little guy. It's science. The big guys pay for the regulations they want

    That's a dumb oversimplification. Especially when repealing regulation is what gave us the TBTFs in the first place.
    I agree to a point. It isn't created to help the big guys, but it's generally the undesirable ending consequence. Regulations tend to be convoluted, and the big guys have the money and resources to find ways around them or take advantage of them, while the little guys don't.
    Sort of. Probably most of the time even. But still an oversimplification. In the Glass Steagall reference I alluded to, no amount of corporate wizardry was ever going to create conglomerates as large as the ones that emerged and held our economy hostage when that barrier was blown up. Smart regulation is hard, but it's not impossible.
    Have you seen the roster we currently trot out there in Washington? A bunch of Clay’s and Jimmy’s. We are fucked Gator
    GreenRiverGatorzdnc
  • doogiedoogie Member Posts: 15,072
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    Rule 1

    Regulations help the big guy and crush the little guy. It's science. The big guys pay for the regulations they want

    That's a dumb oversimplification. Especially when repealing regulation is what gave us the TBTFs in the first place.
    I agree to a point. It isn't created to help the big guys, but it's generally the undesirable ending consequence. Regulations tend to be convoluted, and the big guys have the money and resources to find ways around them or take advantage of them, while the little guys don't.
    Sort of. Probably most of the time even. But still an oversimplification. In the Glass Steagall reference I alluded to, no amount of corporate wizardry was ever going to create conglomerates as large as the ones that emerged and held our economy hostage when that barrier was blown up. Smart regulation is hard, but it's not impossible.
    Who hires the lobbyists to write the regulations in the first place?

    GreenRiverGatorz
  • GreenRiverGatorzGreenRiverGatorz Member, Swaye's Wigwam Posts: 9,041
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    doogie said:

    Rule 1

    Regulations help the big guy and crush the little guy. It's science. The big guys pay for the regulations they want

    That's a dumb oversimplification. Especially when repealing regulation is what gave us the TBTFs in the first place.
    I agree to a point. It isn't created to help the big guys, but it's generally the undesirable ending consequence. Regulations tend to be convoluted, and the big guys have the money and resources to find ways around them or take advantage of them, while the little guys don't.
    Sort of. Probably most of the time even. But still an oversimplification. In the Glass Steagall reference I alluded to, no amount of corporate wizardry was ever going to create conglomerates as large as the ones that emerged and held our economy hostage when that barrier was blown up. Smart regulation is hard, but it's not impossible.
    Who hires the lobbyists to write the regulations in the first place?

    You should look into getting paid for this hard hitting insight. Not quite $10.95 worthy, but damn close.
    1to392831weretaken
  • doogiedoogie Member Posts: 15,072
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  • UW_Doog_BotUW_Doog_Bot Member, Swaye's Wigwam Posts: 10,741
    Swaye's Wigwam 10,000 Up Votes 10,000 Awesomes 10000 Comments

    Rule 1

    Regulations help the big guy and crush the little guy. It's science. The big guys pay for the regulations they want

    That's a dumb oversimplification. Especially when repealing regulation is what gave us the TBTFs in the first place.
    I agree to a point. It isn't created to help the big guys, but it's generally the undesirable ending consequence. Regulations tend to be convoluted, and the big guys have the money and resources to find ways around them or take advantage of them, while the little guys don't.
    Sort of. Probably most of the time even. But still an oversimplification. In the Glass Steagall reference I alluded to, no amount of corporate wizardry was ever going to create conglomerates as large as the ones that emerged and held our economy hostage when that barrier was blown up. Smart regulation is hard, but it's not impossible.
    High barriers to entry(from regulation) and market interventionism is what created the need for Glass Steagall in the first place.
    RaceBannonGreenRiverGatorzpawz
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