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Effect of Student Debt on the Economy Stupid

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Comments

  • 2001400ex2001400ex Posts: 16,721
    10000 Comments 250 Answers Fifth Anniversary 500 Awesomes

    2001400ex said:

    pawz said:

    pawz said:

    pawz said:

    Swaye said:

    Mosster47 said:

    Honestly student debt isn't that big of a deal.

    Most poeple with a ton of debt and stupid degrees are somewhat hot girls.

    They get some dude to pay for them eventually.


    If you're a guy with that then you are an idiot.

    Young people can be wise
    True.

    When they turn 40.
    Wisdom has nothing to do with it.

    If you are a consumer that buys new today you're poor. An education, a modest home, a kid, and two Kia's means you are poor for the most part. If you are throwing 10% into your IRA like a responsible person you're paycheck to paycheck long term.

    Prices of life items increased 200-300% in the last fifteen years and I'm guessing, but I would say wages might have increased 50%. It's probably closer to 35% though.
    Have no idea if you're numbers are perfect, but the point is valid. I bought a brand new, fully loaded (every single option you could get) GMC Z-71 half ton in 1995. Cost me 24,000 out the door (TTL) with the dealer even throwing in a bed mounted gooseneck to seal the deal.

    Went into a Ford dealership a couple years ago to look at a fully loaded with everything half ton. 62K. Probably could have walked out of the dealership with it (TTL and haggling) for 60K.

    I didn't buy it. Price has more than doubled in 20 years, while I bet average wages have gone up less than 40 percent. It's fucking absurd. Electronics and laptops have gotten cheaper, everything else - houses, education, vehicles, milk and bread has doubled since the mid to late 90's, and wages haven't even come close to keeping up. Everyone talks about the lack of skilled worker jobs is what has killed the middle class...but I think prices have contributed at least as much, if not more. But what do I know. I'll just get drunk and think about it some more.
    The issuance of debt contributes to inflation vis-a-vis less push back to cost. Unless you run a bidness (investment) that needs the vehicle, it's a consumerism.

    For most, education is becoming consumerism.

    Inflation and the issuance of debt are one-hand-washing-the-other pinching the middle class into modern day slavery.

    Can middle class stay ahead/even with inflation sans the issuance of debt? Good question.



    Consumer debt is the bigger evil, imo.
    It must be pointed out I recognize a healthy economy does have a low, single-digit inflation rate.

    However, the industries discussed - education, big pharma/medicine and autos - have all grossly outstripped the historical CPI.

    In my view, this is due to a system foistered around insuring payment vis-a-vis unlimited debt issuance and absolving other market-level cost impingements.
    I was wrong about them autos ...







    Thing is, overall things are more accessible to the population now. Back in the 70s, it was a big deal to but a washer and dryer or fridge, for instance. Now that shits just throw away. I have bought 2 washer and dryers and 2 fridges in the 9 years I've owned this house. But unless you are buying top of the line shit, like $3,000 for a fridge, then really they are way more accessible to buy than in the 70s.

    Vehicles are cheaper now because of interest rates really. And the internet. When you can buy at zero percent or 2.99% and shop Dave Smith and Dennis Dillon, it changes the equation. My local dealer wants $65k for a new Denali Duramax 1 ton or I can drive to Boise and get one from Dennis Dillion for $56k. And register in Montana for no sales tax.
    You register in cuntville for the "I have no balls" tax
    Wut?

    photo 198308FA-1C77-4644-A9A6-0289A2E4D216_zpsexsiyyl9.jpg
  • Mosster47Mosster47 Posts: 5,591
    5000 Comments 250 Answers 500 Awesomes 500 Up Votes

    pawz said:

    pawz said:

    pawz said:

    Swaye said:

    Mosster47 said:

    Honestly student debt isn't that big of a deal.

    Most poeple with a ton of debt and stupid degrees are somewhat hot girls.

    They get some dude to pay for them eventually.


    If you're a guy with that then you are an idiot.

    Young people can be wise
    True.

    When they turn 40.
    Wisdom has nothing to do with it.

    If you are a consumer that buys new today you're poor. An education, a modest home, a kid, and two Kia's means you are poor for the most part. If you are throwing 10% into your IRA like a responsible person you're paycheck to paycheck long term.

    Prices of life items increased 200-300% in the last fifteen years and I'm guessing, but I would say wages might have increased 50%. It's probably closer to 35% though.
    Have no idea if you're numbers are perfect, but the point is valid. I bought a brand new, fully loaded (every single option you could get) GMC Z-71 half ton in 1995. Cost me 24,000 out the door (TTL) with the dealer even throwing in a bed mounted gooseneck to seal the deal.

    Went into a Ford dealership a couple years ago to look at a fully loaded with everything half ton. 62K. Probably could have walked out of the dealership with it (TTL and haggling) for 60K.

    I didn't buy it. Price has more than doubled in 20 years, while I bet average wages have gone up less than 40 percent. It's fucking absurd. Electronics and laptops have gotten cheaper, everything else - houses, education, vehicles, milk and bread has doubled since the mid to late 90's, and wages haven't even come close to keeping up. Everyone talks about the lack of skilled worker jobs is what has killed the middle class...but I think prices have contributed at least as much, if not more. But what do I know. I'll just get drunk and think about it some more.
    The issuance of debt contributes to inflation vis-a-vis less push back to cost. Unless you run a bidness (investment) that needs the vehicle, it's a consumerism.

    For most, education is becoming consumerism.

    Inflation and the issuance of debt are one-hand-washing-the-other pinching the middle class into modern day slavery.

    Can middle class stay ahead/even with inflation sans the issuance of debt? Good question.



    Consumer debt is the bigger evil, imo.
    It must be pointed out I recognize a healthy economy does have a low, single-digit inflation rate.

    However, the industries discussed - education, big pharma/medicine and autos - have all grossly outstripped the historical CPI.

    In my view, this is due to a system foistered around insuring payment vis-a-vis unlimited debt issuance and absolving other market-level cost impingements.
    I was wrong about them autos ...







    I have a hunch that pick up trucks aren't the best measure of inflation in the auto market. Seems that a lot of folks in the market for them aren't the most responsible of consumers and want a tuff rig with all the bells and whistles. Finance that mother fucker and insure it!

    Look at something lame like a Toyota Camry. In 1998 MSRP for a fully loaded one was $22,500 or $34,500 in 2018 USD. In 2018 sticker on a fully loaded Camry is about $34,500 so right inline with CPI for inflation over the past 20 years.
    We didn't go to war to come home and turn into fags.

    Camry stats are for....well, fags.
  • YellowSnowYellowSnow Posts: 9,336
    Swaye's Wigwam 5000 Comments 250 Answers 500 Awesomes
    Mosster47 said:

    pawz said:

    pawz said:

    pawz said:

    Swaye said:

    Mosster47 said:

    Honestly student debt isn't that big of a deal.

    Most poeple with a ton of debt and stupid degrees are somewhat hot girls.

    They get some dude to pay for them eventually.


    If you're a guy with that then you are an idiot.

    Young people can be wise
    True.

    When they turn 40.
    Wisdom has nothing to do with it.

    If you are a consumer that buys new today you're poor. An education, a modest home, a kid, and two Kia's means you are poor for the most part. If you are throwing 10% into your IRA like a responsible person you're paycheck to paycheck long term.

    Prices of life items increased 200-300% in the last fifteen years and I'm guessing, but I would say wages might have increased 50%. It's probably closer to 35% though.
    Have no idea if you're numbers are perfect, but the point is valid. I bought a brand new, fully loaded (every single option you could get) GMC Z-71 half ton in 1995. Cost me 24,000 out the door (TTL) with the dealer even throwing in a bed mounted gooseneck to seal the deal.

    Went into a Ford dealership a couple years ago to look at a fully loaded with everything half ton. 62K. Probably could have walked out of the dealership with it (TTL and haggling) for 60K.

    I didn't buy it. Price has more than doubled in 20 years, while I bet average wages have gone up less than 40 percent. It's fucking absurd. Electronics and laptops have gotten cheaper, everything else - houses, education, vehicles, milk and bread has doubled since the mid to late 90's, and wages haven't even come close to keeping up. Everyone talks about the lack of skilled worker jobs is what has killed the middle class...but I think prices have contributed at least as much, if not more. But what do I know. I'll just get drunk and think about it some more.
    The issuance of debt contributes to inflation vis-a-vis less push back to cost. Unless you run a bidness (investment) that needs the vehicle, it's a consumerism.

    For most, education is becoming consumerism.

    Inflation and the issuance of debt are one-hand-washing-the-other pinching the middle class into modern day slavery.

    Can middle class stay ahead/even with inflation sans the issuance of debt? Good question.



    Consumer debt is the bigger evil, imo.
    It must be pointed out I recognize a healthy economy does have a low, single-digit inflation rate.

    However, the industries discussed - education, big pharma/medicine and autos - have all grossly outstripped the historical CPI.

    In my view, this is due to a system foistered around insuring payment vis-a-vis unlimited debt issuance and absolving other market-level cost impingements.
    I was wrong about them autos ...







    I have a hunch that pick up trucks aren't the best measure of inflation in the auto market. Seems that a lot of folks in the market for them aren't the most responsible of consumers and want a tuff rig with all the bells and whistles. Finance that mother fucker and insure it!

    Look at something lame like a Toyota Camry. In 1998 MSRP for a fully loaded one was $22,500 or $34,500 in 2018 USD. In 2018 sticker on a fully loaded Camry is about $34,500 so right inline with CPI for inflation over the past 20 years.
    We didn't go to war to come home and turn into fags.

    Camry stats are for....well, fags.
    Camry stays are for fags, yes. I have an 2006 4 Runner which isn't for fags but that stats are the same as the Camry.
  • RaceBannonRaceBannon Posts: 32,830
    Swaye's Wigwam 25000 Comments 250 Answers Fifth Anniversary
    Mosster47 said:

    pawz said:

    pawz said:

    pawz said:

    Swaye said:

    Mosster47 said:

    Honestly student debt isn't that big of a deal.

    Most poeple with a ton of debt and stupid degrees are somewhat hot girls.

    They get some dude to pay for them eventually.


    If you're a guy with that then you are an idiot.

    Young people can be wise
    True.

    When they turn 40.
    Wisdom has nothing to do with it.

    If you are a consumer that buys new today you're poor. An education, a modest home, a kid, and two Kia's means you are poor for the most part. If you are throwing 10% into your IRA like a responsible person you're paycheck to paycheck long term.

    Prices of life items increased 200-300% in the last fifteen years and I'm guessing, but I would say wages might have increased 50%. It's probably closer to 35% though.
    Have no idea if you're numbers are perfect, but the point is valid. I bought a brand new, fully loaded (every single option you could get) GMC Z-71 half ton in 1995. Cost me 24,000 out the door (TTL) with the dealer even throwing in a bed mounted gooseneck to seal the deal.

    Went into a Ford dealership a couple years ago to look at a fully loaded with everything half ton. 62K. Probably could have walked out of the dealership with it (TTL and haggling) for 60K.

    I didn't buy it. Price has more than doubled in 20 years, while I bet average wages have gone up less than 40 percent. It's fucking absurd. Electronics and laptops have gotten cheaper, everything else - houses, education, vehicles, milk and bread has doubled since the mid to late 90's, and wages haven't even come close to keeping up. Everyone talks about the lack of skilled worker jobs is what has killed the middle class...but I think prices have contributed at least as much, if not more. But what do I know. I'll just get drunk and think about it some more.
    The issuance of debt contributes to inflation vis-a-vis less push back to cost. Unless you run a bidness (investment) that needs the vehicle, it's a consumerism.

    For most, education is becoming consumerism.

    Inflation and the issuance of debt are one-hand-washing-the-other pinching the middle class into modern day slavery.

    Can middle class stay ahead/even with inflation sans the issuance of debt? Good question.



    Consumer debt is the bigger evil, imo.
    It must be pointed out I recognize a healthy economy does have a low, single-digit inflation rate.

    However, the industries discussed - education, big pharma/medicine and autos - have all grossly outstripped the historical CPI.

    In my view, this is due to a system foistered around insuring payment vis-a-vis unlimited debt issuance and absolving other market-level cost impingements.
    I was wrong about them autos ...







    I have a hunch that pick up trucks aren't the best measure of inflation in the auto market. Seems that a lot of folks in the market for them aren't the most responsible of consumers and want a tuff rig with all the bells and whistles. Finance that mother fucker and insure it!

    Look at something lame like a Toyota Camry. In 1998 MSRP for a fully loaded one was $22,500 or $34,500 in 2018 USD. In 2018 sticker on a fully loaded Camry is about $34,500 so right inline with CPI for inflation over the past 20 years.
    We didn't go to war to come home and turn into fags.

    disagree

  • YellowSnowYellowSnow Posts: 9,336
    Swaye's Wigwam 5000 Comments 250 Answers 500 Awesomes

    Mosster47 said:

    pawz said:

    pawz said:

    pawz said:

    Swaye said:

    Mosster47 said:

    Honestly student debt isn't that big of a deal.

    Most poeple with a ton of debt and stupid degrees are somewhat hot girls.

    They get some dude to pay for them eventually.


    If you're a guy with that then you are an idiot.

    Young people can be wise
    True.

    When they turn 40.
    Wisdom has nothing to do with it.

    If you are a consumer that buys new today you're poor. An education, a modest home, a kid, and two Kia's means you are poor for the most part. If you are throwing 10% into your IRA like a responsible person you're paycheck to paycheck long term.

    Prices of life items increased 200-300% in the last fifteen years and I'm guessing, but I would say wages might have increased 50%. It's probably closer to 35% though.
    Have no idea if you're numbers are perfect, but the point is valid. I bought a brand new, fully loaded (every single option you could get) GMC Z-71 half ton in 1995. Cost me 24,000 out the door (TTL) with the dealer even throwing in a bed mounted gooseneck to seal the deal.

    Went into a Ford dealership a couple years ago to look at a fully loaded with everything half ton. 62K. Probably could have walked out of the dealership with it (TTL and haggling) for 60K.

    I didn't buy it. Price has more than doubled in 20 years, while I bet average wages have gone up less than 40 percent. It's fucking absurd. Electronics and laptops have gotten cheaper, everything else - houses, education, vehicles, milk and bread has doubled since the mid to late 90's, and wages haven't even come close to keeping up. Everyone talks about the lack of skilled worker jobs is what has killed the middle class...but I think prices have contributed at least as much, if not more. But what do I know. I'll just get drunk and think about it some more.
    The issuance of debt contributes to inflation vis-a-vis less push back to cost. Unless you run a bidness (investment) that needs the vehicle, it's a consumerism.

    For most, education is becoming consumerism.

    Inflation and the issuance of debt are one-hand-washing-the-other pinching the middle class into modern day slavery.

    Can middle class stay ahead/even with inflation sans the issuance of debt? Good question.



    Consumer debt is the bigger evil, imo.
    It must be pointed out I recognize a healthy economy does have a low, single-digit inflation rate.

    However, the industries discussed - education, big pharma/medicine and autos - have all grossly outstripped the historical CPI.

    In my view, this is due to a system foistered around insuring payment vis-a-vis unlimited debt issuance and absolving other market-level cost impingements.
    I was wrong about them autos ...







    I have a hunch that pick up trucks aren't the best measure of inflation in the auto market. Seems that a lot of folks in the market for them aren't the most responsible of consumers and want a tuff rig with all the bells and whistles. Finance that mother fucker and insure it!

    Look at something lame like a Toyota Camry. In 1998 MSRP for a fully loaded one was $22,500 or $34,500 in 2018 USD. In 2018 sticker on a fully loaded Camry is about $34,500 so right inline with CPI for inflation over the past 20 years.
    We didn't go to war to come home and turn into fags.

    disagree

    I won't ask if you don't tell.
  • salemcoogsalemcoog Posts: 8,715
    5000 Comments 250 Answers 500 Awesomes 500 Up Votes

    Mosster47 said:

    pawz said:

    pawz said:

    pawz said:

    Swaye said:

    Mosster47 said:

    Honestly student debt isn't that big of a deal.

    Most poeple with a ton of debt and stupid degrees are somewhat hot girls.

    They get some dude to pay for them eventually.


    If you're a guy with that then you are an idiot.

    Young people can be wise
    True.

    When they turn 40.
    Wisdom has nothing to do with it.

    If you are a consumer that buys new today you're poor. An education, a modest home, a kid, and two Kia's means you are poor for the most part. If you are throwing 10% into your IRA like a responsible person you're paycheck to paycheck long term.

    Prices of life items increased 200-300% in the last fifteen years and I'm guessing, but I would say wages might have increased 50%. It's probably closer to 35% though.
    Have no idea if you're numbers are perfect, but the point is valid. I bought a brand new, fully loaded (every single option you could get) GMC Z-71 half ton in 1995. Cost me 24,000 out the door (TTL) with the dealer even throwing in a bed mounted gooseneck to seal the deal.

    Went into a Ford dealership a couple years ago to look at a fully loaded with everything half ton. 62K. Probably could have walked out of the dealership with it (TTL and haggling) for 60K.

    I didn't buy it. Price has more than doubled in 20 years, while I bet average wages have gone up less than 40 percent. It's fucking absurd. Electronics and laptops have gotten cheaper, everything else - houses, education, vehicles, milk and bread has doubled since the mid to late 90's, and wages haven't even come close to keeping up. Everyone talks about the lack of skilled worker jobs is what has killed the middle class...but I think prices have contributed at least as much, if not more. But what do I know. I'll just get drunk and think about it some more.
    The issuance of debt contributes to inflation vis-a-vis less push back to cost. Unless you run a bidness (investment) that needs the vehicle, it's a consumerism.

    For most, education is becoming consumerism.

    Inflation and the issuance of debt are one-hand-washing-the-other pinching the middle class into modern day slavery.

    Can middle class stay ahead/even with inflation sans the issuance of debt? Good question.



    Consumer debt is the bigger evil, imo.
    It must be pointed out I recognize a healthy economy does have a low, single-digit inflation rate.

    However, the industries discussed - education, big pharma/medicine and autos - have all grossly outstripped the historical CPI.

    In my view, this is due to a system foistered around insuring payment vis-a-vis unlimited debt issuance and absolving other market-level cost impingements.
    I was wrong about them autos ...







    I have a hunch that pick up trucks aren't the best measure of inflation in the auto market. Seems that a lot of folks in the market for them aren't the most responsible of consumers and want a tuff rig with all the bells and whistles. Finance that mother fucker and insure it!

    Look at something lame like a Toyota Camry. In 1998 MSRP for a fully loaded one was $22,500 or $34,500 in 2018 USD. In 2018 sticker on a fully loaded Camry is about $34,500 so right inline with CPI for inflation over the past 20 years.
    We didn't go to war to come home and turn into fags.

    disagree

    I won't ask if you don't tell.
    You don't have to ask and ol Moss' has many tells.
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